SEVERE WEATHER AND GENERAL EMERGENCY PLAN

PARISH OF WARDINGTON

 

Introduction

 

Oxfordshire County Council (OCC) have recommended that parishes formulate a severe weather/emergency plan which is based upon looking after the elderly, sick and infirm who may need to get to a doctor/surgery/hospital in an emergency.

 

Wardington Parish Council have asked me to formulate a simple, basic plan that would be readily available for ALL parishioners in a genuine case of practical assistance – and not just for severe winter weather.

 

 

SEVERE WEATHER PLAN

 

In the event of the roads being closed by snow, the following 4x4s are available for transportation of any ill parishioner either to the nearest Rendezvous point [R.V] for an Ambulance.

 

The RV points are:

Junction from Wardington onto A361 Southbound.

Junction from Wardington onto A361 Northbound [Taylors cottage].

Junction of Edgecote Lane onto A361.

 

In all cases, the RV point MUST be described to the emergency service dispatcher.

 

 

AREAS OF 4X4 COVER AND DRIVERS

 

Ken Atack               Williamscot Area                                                       758661

Amanda Thompson          Edgecote Lane To 1st Turn [Taylors Cottage]      750843

Henri Senn              As above                                                    750108

Andrew Steven          Old Pool Area to End of Thorpe Road [N]           750765

Caroline Wild           As above                                                             758661

Robert Harwood          Old Pool Area to Corner Mount and to A361          758174

 

Anyone in need of assistance should call the volunteer CLOSEST to you

There is bound to be an occasion when not all volunteers are available so just keep ringing the numbers until you get the help you need.

 

 

ROAD CLEARANCE

 

OCC Highways try and keep clear the main roads but will not salt bus routes on non-priority roads.  Despite requests this has usually meant that the bus route through Wardington has not been cleared or salted.

 

Farmers Mr George Page [758122] and Steven Breakspear [750161] have kindly agreed to provide a tractor to try and keep the snow down on the main roads out of the village on a re-imbursement basis.

 

SALT BINS

The village salt bins are provided solely for use on public roads and pavements and NOT for private drive ways.  This Winter we have been notified by OCC highways that they will be filled on a once only basis and will not be refilled.

 

Triage Service

Mr John Rourke [Taylors Cottage] has very kindly offered a Triage service as a qualified person in the event of a medical emergency subject to his availability.

 

The Parish Clerk wishes to offer a FOOD AND PRESCRIPTION COLLECTION SERVICE for ALL Parishioners OVER 60 or for those who are housebound to illness regardless of age.  Tel 758174 / 07800 583491

 

SUGGESTED ITEMS TO HAVE HANDY IN THE HOUSE

 

FIRST AID KIT

TORCH

BATTERY OP OR WIND UP RADIO

ENOUGH MEDICATION

SHOVEL/SPADE

THERMOS FLASK

CANDLES

MATCHES

ANALOGUE TELEPHONE in the event of a Power failure.

 

CHECKING ON ELDERLY/INFIRM/ILL/THOSE LIVING ALONE

 

We are such a strong and good natured community – PLEASE do remember to check upon those friends and neighbours who fit into the above categories during severe weather.

 

Thank you all for taking the time to read and keep handy – let us hope that we never have to execute it!

 

 

SNOW GUIDE – BASED ON ADVICE FROM OCC

 

THE LAW

 

There is no law preventing you from clearing snow and ice on the pavement outside your property, pathways to your property or public spaces.

 

It is very unlikely that you would face any legal liability, as long as you are careful, and use common sense to ensure that you do not make the pavement or pathway clearly more dangerous than before. People using areas affected by snow and ice also have responsibility to be careful themselves.

 

What you can do to help clear snow and ice from pavements and public spaces

 

Practical advice from highway engineers is given below. This is not a comprehensive list.

 

  • Start early: it is much easier to remove fresh, loose snow compared to compacted ice that has been compressed by people walking on it.
  • Do not use hot water. This will melt the snow, but may replace it with black ice, increasing the risk of injury.
  • Be a good neighbour: some people may be unable to clear snow and ice on paths leading to their property or indeed the footway fronting their property. Snowfall and cold weather pose particular difficulties for them gaining access to and from their property or walking to the shops.
  • If shovelling snow, consider where you are going to put it, so that it does not block people’s paths, or block drainage channels. This could shift the problem elsewhere.
  • Make a pathway down the middle of the area to be cleared first, so you have a clear surface to walk on. Then you can shovel the snow from the centre to the sides.
  • Spreading some salt on the area you have cleared will help to prevent any ice forming. Table salt or dishwasher salt will work, but avoid spreading on plants or grass as they may be damaged by it. A few grams (a tablespoon) for each square metre you clear should work. The salt found in salting bins will be needed for keeping roads clear.
  • Particular care and attention should be given to steps and steep gradients to ensure snow and ice is removed. You might need to apply additional salt to these areas.
  • Use the sun to your advantage. Removing the top layer of snow will allow the sun to melt any ice beneath; however you will need to cover any ice with salt to stop it refreezing overnight.
  • If there is no salt available, then a little sand or ash is a reasonable substitute. It will not have the same de-icing properties as salt but should offer grip under foot.

 

 

Robert Harwood

PARISH CLERK

OCTOBER 15TH 2011